Pathfinder Horror Adventures

horror-adventureAt GenCon 2016, I had the pleasure of interviewing wesley Schneider. He is the editor-in-chief at Paizo but also a contributor to their newest release, Horror Adventures. He was kind enough to give me a copy of it and the book, Bloodbound. Life has been busy but I have finally had the time to dig into Horror Adventures and share my thoughts on the book.

The book itself is a gorgeous artifact. It is a 254 page hard bound book. The interior is full color and continues in the tradition of the other books using the iconic heroes as the subjects of the art throughout the book. I always love the art in the Pathfinder books. It is well done and evocative of the themes and mechanics that are found throughout the tome. I especially appreciate the work done on the index. It makes finding specific things much easier and in a book this size it is important.

Horror Adventures is a tool box. It gathers together game mechanics, character options, spells, monsters, and advice to allow both players and game masters to run horror games using the Pathfinder system. The book is filled to the brim with useful information and tweaks that can be made to run a great horror game or campaign.

I am just going to hit the pieces here that stood out for me.

The first thing that I love about this book is that it takes the time to address expectations from both the player and the game master side. From the game master’s perspective, it addresses the need to understand whom you are trying to scare or creep out. Are you trying to scare the characters or the players? Both are viable options but require different ways of handling the game and a different level of consent. I like that the authors of the book make this distinction. Trying to scare your players can crossover into territory that can be very uncomfortable. Taking the time to talk to the players about what they can handle and having a system in place to just stop if things become unbearable it important in games like this. From the player’s perspective, it addresses the need to give up a level of control on the character. Your character has to be afraid of something and react poorly to situations or the power of a horror game is muted or lost.

The authors also take the time to address the differences between a fantasy adventure game and a horror game. In horror, the process is loss and degradation of resources. This leads to the loss of most of the characters in a horror setting save the few lone survivors. In Fantasy, the progression is the opposite direction. Characters get stronger and stronger an collect more and more resources. The authors point out how this does not make horror impossible. They show how the threats scale despite the inevitable triumph of the player characters. There are several techniques highlighted in the book for making this possible. In particular, I like how they call out players to give their characters family, friends, and goals. These things create more in depth characters and also give them things to lose in a horror game.

Another thing that stood out for me was the addition of Corruptions. These are templates that you would add to a character after they have been exposed to something horrible in the world such as Vampirism or Lycanthropy or due to choice, Lichdom. Corruptions provide a system whereby characters have certain benefits and drawbacks from these conditions. This allows for the player to struggle with both the power that comes from the whatever they have garnered as well as fight against the descent into darkness. These formalize processes that are more vague in the standard Pathfinder game or are easily overcome with a single spell. Thus, a series of games is strung together to overcome this path of destruction.

A great idea!

The books provides plenty of options for making changes to player characters. There are new racial benefits that fit better within a horror setting as well as class archetypes that create some terrifying villains for players to face. My favorite player facing changes are the story feats in this book. Twisted Love is my favorite. This is a feat that is very much a riff on Strahd from Ravenloft. You are mistaken for a monster or villain’s lost love. You gain a certain benefit for having this feat and an additional feature for completing the storyline. I love that there is this call out in the book and that this trope is something mechanically supported by this book. I can not wait to give it a try!

The book also provides a plethora of mechanics around fear, madness, curses, and setting to help create an environment that is inimical to the lives of the heroes. In particular, there are rules for creating domains for powerful evil creatures. This dovetails nicely with the story feats allowing game masters to recreate Ravenloft or any domain of dread that they may want to utilize. The rules give directions on how the domain is formed, the rules that would hold sway within it and how the borders are closed and ultimately how to destroy one. It allows cooperative group to come together and craft a story together to explore a specific trope of horror for a while within their own heroic fantasy game.

Paizo has created a great toolbox for for horror fans with Horror Adventures. It provides players and game masters with plenty of new bells and whistles to add to the game along with excellent advice on how to run any type of horror game you would like in Pathfinder.

Four bear paws out of four! A definite must have for any fan of horror or fantasy gaming.

 

One comment

  1. Terry says:

    Thanks Rob!
    You make me want to try this system and definitely this expansion! Keep up the Awsomeness!

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